Home > Agile, Modelling, planning, scrum, Usability > Creating a mindmap specification

Creating a mindmap specification

In one of my projects, one of the lead developers asked me for a flow chart, describing the things we’re building. Far from the scrum product backlog, yes, but I decided to give it a try.

I downloaded XMind, a free software with a PRO version with really useful functions, but since I’m just testing the concept as a product owner, I decided to test the free version.

The result, many hours later, is a number of connected flow charts which all looks something like this:

flowchart

I started with setting up the basic flow chart, and identified the main steps. All these main steps were given their own page in the workflow workbook and then I started drilling down. I looked at all steps and identified which functions I wanted to be available from that step and if there were any special scenarios. To help me out, I have the work from our user interface designer, so all I had to do was translate his work into this flowchart and identify these special scenarios. Well, “all I had to do” is perhaps to simplify the task. I will not hide that it was hard and sometimes gruesome work. For each step I covered, I identified more special cases which I need to find solutions for.

But after a while I got to really like this approach. I focused on one step at the time. Took a good look at that step and tried to think about if I’d really seen all the ways to which one could come to that step and I tried so see which steps were possible from there. The nice little note functionality made it possible to add all those special scenarios and questions.

In a couple of hours I had documented all those discussions we’d had in the project group and I would say that what we have is a number of user stories, but in another format. I can better see the links between stories, and it’s easier to track what the story applies to, without having to write too many X:s under “As a X” if I’d used the user story format.

Also, the diagram does something that user story cards don’t: it puts the story in a context. Yes, a user story does say why we do the story, but it does not show what happens next and what we take for granted has happened before.

So, what about the output? There is a HTML export function which exports not only the image but also the comments and pictures.

WHat about the next step? the next step is to see if the developers like it or not. And if they do, we have to find a way to build using this. But the first step is to see if this is the way to go. What do you think?

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  1. Roland Woldt
    2010/08/23 at 5:44 pm

    Hi Anna,

    you are maintaining a very interesting blog here (which reminds me to finally start by myself …).

    Since I know that you are an ARIS user, I was wondering why you are using XMIND for this purpose and not a specialized BPM/EA tool for this, which allows you to capture that information in a database? Don’t get me wrong – I am using XMIND by myself, but mostly for the purpose it is intended.

    Best
    Roland

    • Anna Forss
      2010/08/24 at 6:36 pm

      THank you, I’ve been a bit of a slow starter this autumn, but I like sharing my experience on this blog. I’m very new with ARIS and I feel a bit freer using XMind…

  2. Roland Woldt
    2010/08/29 at 10:50 am

    let me know if you need help.

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